Archive for the tag 'Seed Stewardship'

For those of you that want all of the delightful details about seed saving, we will be doing it up this Sunday at Sunbow Farm’s Institute of BioWisdom in Corvallis. This workshop really might just contain everything we know about seeds jam packed into five fun-filled hours! Details are below. Please note there is a fee for this class and pre-registration is appreciated (though you may pay at the door).

Hope to see you there!

Sarah and Andrew

SEED SAVING AND SEED STEWARDSHIP: The Path to Locally Adapted Seed and True Food Freedom

May 16 – Instructors: Andrew Still & Sarah Kleeger of the Seed Ambassadors Project and Adaptive Seeds

Workshop focuses:

* -Why Save Seed: A profound act of social and ecological empowerment.
* -History of an Ancient Tradition
* -Seed Sovereignty and Food Freedom in a changing world
* -Willamette Valley as one of the best seed saving regions in the world.
* -Open Pollinated, Heritage/Heirloom, Hybrid and GMO
* -Sources: the importance of choice and diversity
* -Strategies: planning your garden for seed saving
* -Isolation: Crossers and Selfers
* -Population: Inbreeding and Outbreeding
* -Selection: Simple plant breeding for locally adapted seed
* -Harvest, Cleaning and Storage
* -Examples seed stewardship
* -Re-localizing a seed stewardship community

10-3pm, $30 prepay, please register by email and send check to address below, bring lunch.
sunbow@peak.org

Sunbow Farm- Certified Organic since 1984
Institute of BioWisdom-Workshops/Consulting
6910 SW Plymouth Dr
Corvallis,Oregon 97333
541-929-5782
www.SunbowFarm.org

Back yard seed saving with Slow Food Eugene, April 2010

1 Comment Sarah Kleeger on May 12th 2010

Here is the 4th edition of our Seed Ambassadors Project Seed Saving Guide.

“A Guide to Seed Saving, Seed Stewardship & Seed Sovereignty”


Seed Saving Zine 4 hand out (3.8 MB PDF) This hanout formated version is your best choice for printing and reading if you do not have one of those fancy zine staplers.

Seed Saving Zine 4 duplex (3.5 MB PDF) This zine formated version is for printing in a duplex printer and folding into a Zine. That is why the pages seem to be in a wierd order. If your printer does not have duplex ability you can print it one page at a time, flipping each page over to print the back side.

Seed Saving Guide 4th edition

If you would rather us send you a copy that we have printed, please send us $4 to cover printing costs and to help support the Seed Ambassadorts Project. You may also order a copy along with your seed order here at this site under the Books category. If you want to order a bunch of copies for a saving workshop you are teaching, contact us and we will send you what you need for what it costs us to print them.

Enjoy your seed saving adventures

4 Comments Andrew Still on Jan 12th 2010

Our plans for Poland on the 9th of December fell through, and so we found ourselves in Hamburg with lots of options but no plans. We did what we could to pursue new seed-related contacts, even recruiting the help of Christina and Juan, but we found last-minute arrangements around the holidays to be somewhat difficult in Germany.

We wound up staying in Hamburg until our December 17th flight to Lithuania, mostly exploring various parts of the city and lying low.

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One of the contacts Christina pursued for us worked out, and so we spent a delightful afternoon with Karl-Josef Muller, the head of the Association for Biodynamic Plant Breeders, and his fellow cereal breeder Martin Timmermann. Karl Joseph has been breeding for high quality grains in low fertility, low-input organic systems since 1986, and has developed and registered a variety of “naked” barley, Lawina, on the EU’s common catalogue. Take a Look at their website “Cereal Breeding Research Darzau” it contains a lot of great information.

We first checked out of some of their “nursery” plots and grow-out fields of fall-planted rye, spelt, einkorn, and barley on neighboring organic and biodynamic farms. Then we returned to the research center to see some of the specialized equipment (including custom tractor and special de-hulling machine), and then retired to their offices for coffee and a long discussion of the methods and whys and wherefores of organic grain breeding.

Karl-Josef told us, “Our aim is to develop new varieties, but it does not end there. It is also to develop new ideas for new varieties and to research and tell others (even the conventional breeders) what we have learned. Because if the idea is developed, sometimes that is enough for now. The market/interest (in organically developed seeds) is very small, but it is not our job to improve this. What is important is to develop new criteria for farming, organic farming, human being, these ideas.”

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It was a wonderful visit, and we left with a few new varieties of grains (Lawina naked barley and a light grain rye), and shared with Martin some of the perennial wheat that we had brought. We also left with our heads full of new ideas and information.

No Comments Sarah Kleeger on Dec 18th 2006