Archive for the 'Oregon & PNW' Category

What is one of the most empowering community building activities? Seed Swaps of course!

Come join us for the 12th Annual Eugene Food Not Lawns Seed Swap in Eugene.

Saturday, December 14, 2013  – 10:00am until 1:00pm

The fall-winter Food Not Lawns seed swap in Eugene traditionally attracts high quality seed from experienced seed stewards, eating out of local soils. Please bring seed or other abundance to share freely. Feel free to come come completely empty-handed

2013 Food Not Lawns Seed Swap 12th Annual

2013 Food Not Lawns Seed Swap 12th Annual

1 Comment Andrew Still on Dec 6th 2013

Plant breeder and author Carol Deppe’s 2013 seed list is now available at her website:  http://caroldeppe.com/FVS Seed List 2013.html

Her seed company, Fertile Valley Seeds, is your opportunity to get interesting new varieties straight from the source, including some of her work that is not available from any other seed company in the US.

Highlights of the 2013 seed list include winter squash, dry corn and beans, garbanzos, peas, kale, lettuce, amaranth, and more.

Carol ships seeds only until April 30, so get your order in soon, and directly support more public-domain, open pollinated seed breeding!

No Comments Sarah Kleeger on Mar 7th 2013

This year’s Spring Propagation Fair is set for Saturday, March 23, from 11 am to 3 pm at Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon. This community event is free and open to the public.

As always, seed, plants, and scion will be available free of charge. Root stock and grafting services will be available for a small fee. There will be speakers presenting throughout the day (including us!)

Find out all of the juicy details at the official website:

http://springpropagationfair.com/

Volunteers are needed for this event.

No Comments Sarah Kleeger on Feb 20th 2013

2013 Rye Ramble (reprinted from the Adaptive Seeds printed catalog.)

—-

Bringing Biodiversity Back for Real, Explained…

We don’t write long variety descriptions because it is simply interesting and we don’t choose rare varieties because they are simply novel.

I feel that seeds, with the biodiversity and cultural knowledge they embody, are a doorway into the mystical realms of our reality. That sounds a little funny and I am not trying to lose you into a woo-woo made-up universe here. I am just trying to explain some reasons for why we do what we do. And predictably every year we discover more reasons for doing this seedy thing.

Frosty Fennel Seed

Frosty Fennel Seed

We write long descriptions and choose rare varieties for the sake of conservation, food security, the joy of the experience, and the encouragement from others to continue the hard work; these are all good reasons. But these reasons are like the layers of a leek stem. Every reason we give is a layer of the leek and we keep getting closer and closer to the core. One day we will get to the apical meristem and continue to peel and there will be an empty space where there was a growth point, mysteriously keeping its secrets from us. And yes, this is yet another reason we give ourselves to continue this journey, because we won’t know every reason.

So why do we write these long descriptions when other seed companies write one sentence and sometimes even get the color wrong? What it comes down to for me is that cultural knowledge about seed varieties has eroded even faster than the seed varieties themselves.

An agro-ecosystem, like any ecosystem, can lose genetic diversity. (You probably already know this next part and it’s probably why you came to our seed catalog.) Over the past few centuries the industrialization of agriculture has contributed to the near total loss of all agricultural biodiversity. You might say it is an exaggeration to say near total, but according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, we have lost 75% since 1900 and continue to lose 2% every year. When considering losses before 1900, and that most of these estimates include the varieties kept in gene banks that are considered “saved from extinction,” then you must estimate that nearly all agricultural biodiversity has been lost.

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2 Comments Andrew Still on Jan 24th 2013

The Spring Propagation Fair will be Saturday, March 24, from 11- 5, at Lane Community College in Eugene, OR.

The free event includes a seed swap, scion wood (root stock available for a small fee), and workshops throughout the event.

The folks putting on this year’s Spring Propagation Fair have a snazzy website. It’s chock full of information, including workshop schedule and info on some of the great scion wood that will be available.

Check out the website at http://springpropagationfair.com.

See you there!

No Comments Sarah Kleeger on Mar 15th 2012

The Institute of Contemporary Ethnobotany and the Seed Ambassadors Project present:

The 12th ANNUAL: FOOD NOT LAWNS SEED SWAP
Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011
1:00 – 3:00 pm
FREE
The Community Room at the East Blair Housing Coop,
940 W. 4th st. Eugene, OR.
(Btwn. Adams & Jackson also accessable from W. 4th alley)
Build community by sharing surplus harvest bounty with your friends and neighbors at this annual event.
Bring your seeds, plants, canned goods, brews, tinctures, food, instruments, friends, or just yourself!

This is going to be great fun as usual and we hope to see some new faces.

It is OK to come empty handed, however you may be empowered to come next time carrying a bounty to share.

No Comments Andrew Still on Nov 4th 2011

We’ll be leading a seed saving workshop in Eugene this Saturday October 1st, at a super cool community garden plot that was planted as a seed garden.

Nikki Maxwell’s RAFT Garden features endangered Northwest Heirloom crops, including Oregon Giant Pole Beans, Immigrant Bush Dry Beans, Lower Salmon River Squash, Hooker’s Sweet Corn, Marshal Strawberries, and Oregon Delicious Melons. RAFT stands for Renewing America’s Food Traditions, and is an alliance that seeks to preserve, protect, and promote the incredible, regional, food diversity of North America. The vegetables in the RAFT garden are all featured in the Slow Food Ark of Taste which means they are all delicious and are in danger of extinction.

We’ll do some hands on seed saving of each of these crops, and provide samples of some of them for folks to snack on. Did I mention there will be dozens of Oregon Delicious Melons there? In addition to going home with Melon Belly, participants will also have the opportunity to take home seeds of these varieties, Free!

The RAFT garden is located at the east end of the Whittaker Community Garden, near the river bike path at the end of N. Polk in Eugene. Bring your own chair if you want to sit. The event is free and open to the public, and will begin 2pm.

Please spread the word among your gardening friends!

No Comments Sarah Kleeger on Sep 28th 2011

Come and tour Open Oak Farm the home of Adaptive Seeds and The Seed Ambassadors Project. August 4th 4-9PM. It is a potluck dinner event and Tour Organized by the Southern Willamette Valley Bean and Grain Project. Parking is limited so RSVP is required. Contact Dan Armstrong at danlarmstrong@comcast.net if you would like to come.

No Comments Andrew Still on Jul 18th 2011

Institute of Biowisdom in Corvallis

 

Seed Saving And Seed Stewardship Workshop:

The Path to Locally Adapted Seed and True Food Freedom

 

May 15, 2011

Instructors: Andrew Still & Sarah Kleeger of the Seed Ambassadors Project , Adaptive Seeds and Open Oak Farm in Brownsville area. Member of Willamette Seed and Grain.

 

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No Comments Andrew Still on May 7th 2011

Hi Everyone,

Spring has sprung, and now it’s time to propagate! (Plants, that is.)

This year’s Spring Propagation fair will be this Sunday, March 27, at Lane Community College in Eugene, from 11 – 5.

Come share and gather seeds, fruit tree scion wood, and other plant propagation materials with your friends and neighbors.

More information is below, including workshop schedule. For more information or to volunteer, please contact victorygardensforall@gmail.com

Hope to see you this Seedy Sunday

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No Comments Sarah Kleeger on Mar 22nd 2011

I know it is mid winter and winter gardens get planted in August at the latest, but we have been looking at an acre of winter vegetables and have been inspired to complete a long needed update of this document. It is version 4.0 and full of new info and opinions. Let us know what you think and we will update it like open source software, slowly but surely.

Big Willamette Winter Garden Chart 4.pdf

Western Front Kale was one of the best winter vegetables in 2010

3 Comments Andrew Still on Jan 23rd 2011

The Institute of Contemporary Ethnobotany and the
Seed Ambassadors Project present:

The 11th ANNUAL: FOOD NOT LAWNS SEED SWAP

Sunday, Dec. 5
1:00 – 3:00 pm
(come at noon to help set up!)
FREE

The Community Room at the East Blair Housing Coop,
940 W. 4th St, Eugene, Oregon
(Between Adams & Jackson also accessible from W. 4th alley)

Build community by sharing surplus harvest bounty with
your friends and neighbors at this annual event.

Bring your seeds, plants, canned goods, brews,
tinctures, food, instruments, friends, or just
yourself! (piano on site…)

See you there!
Your seedy friends

http://www.foodnotlawns.net/

www.seedambassadors.org

http://plants-people.blogspot.com

3 Comments Sarah Kleeger on Nov 27th 2010

We are delighted to have been selected as delegates for this year’s Slow Food Terra Madre gathering in Turin, Italy.

Terra Madre is an international gathering of more than 5,000 people, including “food communities, cooks, academics, youth and musicians, who are united in a desire to promote sustainable local food production in harmony with the environment while respecting knowledge handed down over the generations.”

Now we just need to raise the funds to get us there. To this end, we will be having a benefit dinner this July 31 in Eugene, OR, from 6pm to 9 pm.

We will begin the eventing with a slide show presentation about the importance of local and international seed networks, and what we hope to bring back from Terra Madre.

A five course meal will follow at 7pm, prepared by local chef Tiffany Norton of Party Cart. The meal will feature many ingredients grown on our farm, Open Oak Farm.

There will also be live music and a silent auction, with good local seedy and foodie stuff.

Please join us! There will be lots of pretty pictures, delicious food, and good company.

The cost is $50 per plate ($25 is tax-deductible).

RSVP by July 25 to seedambassadors(at)gmail.com

If you can’t make it but would like to help support our efforts, you can make a donation through PayPal on the Participate page of our website, or by sending check payable to Slow Food Eugene to: The Seed Ambassadors Project, 25079 Brush Creek Road, Sweet Home, OR 97386. Donations made through Slow Food Eugene are tax-deductible; donations made directly to The Seed Ambassadors Project are not.

Thank you for your support!

Back Yard Seed Garden, June 2010

Back Yard Seed Garden, June 2010

No Comments Sarah Kleeger on Jul 15th 2010

7th Annual Winter Cropping Roundtable and Seed Exchange

Where: Food For Lane County Youth Farm in N. Springfield

When:  SATURDAY June 19th, 2010    1.00 – 4.00 p.m.

Who: with Nick Routledge and Andrew Still, Adaptive Seeds,

Workshop is free and no pre-registration is required. Just show up and bring your gardening friends

Advanced winter cropping including a discussion of the specific vegetable and grain crop-types and varieties establishing themselves as proven, local mainstays in the light of tougher winter conditions of late; and our bioregion’s foremost winter seed exchange.

Bring your winter gardening experiences to share and seed to share if you have some.


Directions to the FFLC youth farm:

From Springfield, go north on Pioneer Parkway. At the big roundabout, go west on Hayden Bridge Rd, turn right on Game Farm Rd. At the Baptist church, six blocks down, turn left on Flamingo and go two blocks to the end of the street. You’ll see the Youth Farm on your left.

From Eugene, take Coburg Rd north, then Harlow Rd east, cross I-5, pass Gateway, and turn left on Game Farm Rd (if you hit the big roundabout, you’ve gone one block too far). Six blocks down, at the Baptist church, turn left on Flamingo and go two blocks to the end of the street. You’ll see the Youth Farm on your left.

From I-5 going north: Take Beltline Rd east exit. Continue east on Beltline, cross Gateway. Follow Beltline east until you have passed the large hospital development on your left. Take the next right, which is Cardinal, then go immediately left on Game Farm. At the Baptist church a few blocks up, turn right on Flamingo (the road after Mallard) and go two blocks to the end of the street. You’ll see the Youth Farm on your left.

1 Comment Andrew Still on Jun 16th 2010

For those of you that want all of the delightful details about seed saving, we will be doing it up this Sunday at Sunbow Farm’s Institute of BioWisdom in Corvallis. This workshop really might just contain everything we know about seeds jam packed into five fun-filled hours! Details are below. Please note there is a fee for this class and pre-registration is appreciated (though you may pay at the door).

Hope to see you there!

Sarah and Andrew

SEED SAVING AND SEED STEWARDSHIP: The Path to Locally Adapted Seed and True Food Freedom

May 16 – Instructors: Andrew Still & Sarah Kleeger of the Seed Ambassadors Project and Adaptive Seeds

Workshop focuses:

* -Why Save Seed: A profound act of social and ecological empowerment.
* -History of an Ancient Tradition
* -Seed Sovereignty and Food Freedom in a changing world
* -Willamette Valley as one of the best seed saving regions in the world.
* -Open Pollinated, Heritage/Heirloom, Hybrid and GMO
* -Sources: the importance of choice and diversity
* -Strategies: planning your garden for seed saving
* -Isolation: Crossers and Selfers
* -Population: Inbreeding and Outbreeding
* -Selection: Simple plant breeding for locally adapted seed
* -Harvest, Cleaning and Storage
* -Examples seed stewardship
* -Re-localizing a seed stewardship community

10-3pm, $30 prepay, please register by email and send check to address below, bring lunch.
sunbow@peak.org

Sunbow Farm- Certified Organic since 1984
Institute of BioWisdom-Workshops/Consulting
6910 SW Plymouth Dr
Corvallis,Oregon 97333
541-929-5782
www.SunbowFarm.org

Back yard seed saving with Slow Food Eugene, April 2010

1 Comment Sarah Kleeger on May 12th 2010

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